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Father Eamon Carroll, O.Carm.

BY JOSEPH KERZICH

Fr. Eamon CarrollThe Province of the Most Pure Heart of Mary, Order of Carmelites, mourns the death of the Reverend Eamon R. Carroll, O.Carm., who died at the age of 87 on November 15, 2008, at Carmel at Mission Valley, Nokomis, Florida. Visitation for Father Carroll took place at Epiphany Cathedral, Venice, Florida, the morning of November 19, 2008, with a Mass of Christian Burial immediately following. The Very Reverend John Welch, O.Carm., Prior Provincial, was the main celebrant. Interment immediately followed at Venice Memorial Gardens, Venice, Florida.

Father Eamon was born Richard Joseph Carroll to (the late) Patrick Carroll and (the late) Brigid Fenelon on September 23, 1921, in Chicago, Illinois. Father Eamon was preceded in death by both of his parents as well as his three brothers, Edward Carroll, Emmett Carroll and Kevin Carroll. He is survived by numerous loving nieces and nephews.

Eamon Carroll attended grade school at Saint Anselm Parish and at Holy Cross Parish, both located in Chicago, Illinois, between 1927 and 1935. Entering the Order of Carmelite’s Province of the Most Pure Heart of Mary in 1935, he began formational studies at their preparatory seminary in Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada. Continuing with the Carmelite novitiate at New Baltimore, Pennsylvania, in 1939, Richard Carroll would profess simple vows to the Order in 1940 taking the religious name “Eamon.”

In addition, the year 1940 saw Eamon enrolling in undergraduate studies at Mount Carmel College, Niagara Falls. There, in 1943, Brother Eamon was granted a bachelor’s degree in philosophy.

Carroll transferred to the Province’s major seminary at White-friars Hall, Washington, DC, in 1943. In August of that year he professed solemn vows at Whitefriars. In addition to religious formation he studied both physics and French at nearby Catholic University of America, Washington.

Father Eamon Carroll was ordained a priest on June 8, 1946, at Saint Clara Catholic Church, a parish administered by the Carmelites in Chicago. Shortly thereafter, the newly ordained priest celebrated his first Mass at his home parish of Holy Cross.

In 1947 Father Carroll’s initial assignment was on the faculty of Mount Carmel High School, Chicago. While teaching, he enrolled in language studies: in German at Loyola University in Chicago and Greek, Hebrew and Polish at the University of Chicago.

Father Carroll arrived at Carmelite’s International College of Saint Albert, Rome, Italy, in 1949. Again in the dual role as professor and student, teaching Carmelite seminarians while pursuing his own graduate studies. A student at the Pontifical Gregorian University, Father Carroll received a Licentiate in Sacred Theology (S.T.L.) degree in 1951 and later a Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.) from the Gregorian in 1962. Throughout this time he also completed additional courses in Greek at the Pontifical Oriental Institute, Rome.

Through his lifelong career as a theologian and a professor, Father Carroll developed a special competence in the theology of the Blessed Virgin Mary or “Mariology.” In 1955 Father Carroll returned to Whitefriars Hall, Washington, to instruct the Carmelites of his own Province. He would remain on the Whitefriars faculty until 1968. Concurrently, Father Carroll maintained a seat in the department of theology at Catholic University of America, Washington, teaching there between 1957 and 1980. In 1989, the president of the Catholic University of America bestowed Father Carroll the prestigious President’s Patronal Medal for his distinguished service in the advancement of Marian devotion and theology.

In 1980 Father Eamon accepted the position of professor of theology at Loyola University in Chicago, retiring as professor emeritus in 1993. By this time Father Carroll was on staff at the International Marian Research Institute centered at the Marian Library of the University of Dayton. At Dayton, he was also on the faculty of the summer studies program.

Author of the book Understanding the Mother of Jesus, 1979, M. Glazier, Inc., Father Carroll also contributed many articles on Our Lady, both scholarly and popular. These publications would include the New Catholic Encyclopedia and theological journals such as: Carmelus, Theological Studies, and The Thomist among others.

Father Carroll was a consultant for the interior iconography of the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, DC. He was elected president of the Mariological Society of America in 1957 and also served as president of the Catholic Theological Society of America in 1965. Father Carroll participated in sessions of the International Mariological Congress beginning in 1950, serving as the congress’s secretary many times over. He also was a member of the International Pontifical Marian Academy.

In 1967 Father Carroll was a charter member of the English Ecumenical Society of the Blessed Virgin Mary; he was a founding member of that society’s U.S. counterpart in 1976. Father Eamon Carroll was included in several editions of American Catholic Who’s Who.

Father Carroll would remain in residence at the Carmelite’s Brandsma House near the Loyola University at Chicago’s campus until 2002. It was then that he retired to Carmel at Mission Valley, Nokomis, Florida. He would continue to enjoy the fraternity of his brother Carmelites while maintaining a vigorous hand in writing many scholarly articles throughout his retirement.

May he rest in peace.


Father John Long, O.Carm.

BY JOSEPH KERZICH

Fr. John Long

Members of the Province of the Most Pure Heart of Mary mourn the death of their brother in Carmel, the Reverend John Long, 80, who died on August 26, 2008, in Phoenix, Arizona.

Father John lay in state at Saint Agnes Catholic Church, Phoenix, Arizona, where a Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on Wednesday, September 3, 2008. The Very Reverend John Welch, O.Carm, Prior Provincial, presided and the Reverend Emmett Gavin, O.Carm., was the homilist. Burial was at Holy Cross Cemetery, Phoenix.

Father Long was born on November 20, 1927, in Saint Louis, Missouri. He was educated at Saint Paul the Apostle Grade School and William Cullen McBride Catholic High School, both formerly located in Saint Louis. John received a bachelor’s degree in philosophy at the University of Dayton in 1949. By 1954, John was a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland.

In 1957, John became an instructor at the Centre de Recherche et D’étude Pour la Diffusion du Français (CRÉDIF), Saint Cloud, France. Returning to the United States, John graduated from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in 1959, with a master’s degree in French. A John Hay Fellow, John studied Russian at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, in 1959. Later, in 1961, he was a National Defense Education Act (NDEA) Fellow at San Francisco State University.

Long helped develop a foreign language curriculum for the State of Missouri in 1963. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, he published teaching materials for the study of both French and Russian. During these years he also moderated workshops focused on language methodology for various U.S. colleges and universities.

After a career in language education, John Long responded to a call to ordained ministry within the Catholic Church. In 1982, he entered the novitiate program of the Province of Saint Elias, Order of Carmelites, at Middletown, New York. He professed simple vows with the Carmelites in 1983, subsequently professing solemn vows in 1986, at Transfiguration Church, Tarrytown, New York. Further religious formation occurred at Whitefriars Hall, Washington, DC, the major house of studies for the Carmelites in the United States and Canada. While in Washington, he completed a master’s degree in systematic theology at Washington Theological Union. John returned to his home city of Saint Louis in late September, 1986, to be ordained a Carmelite priest.

Given Father Long’s extensive background in education, it was no surprise that his first assignment after ordination would include serving both as an associate pastor and the director of religious education at Transfiguration Parish in Tarrytown. In 1988, he was transferred to Saint Joseph Parish, Troy, New York, where he continued in pastoral care and religious formation.

In 1991, Father Long was given an inter-provincial assignment with the Carmelite Province of the Most Pure Heart of Mary to work at the Kino Institute in Phoenix, Arizona. Founded in 1978 as a joint effort between the Diocese of Phoenix and the Carmelites, the Kino Institute became the theological resource center for adult Catholics and ministers throughout that diocese. Serving first on the faculty, Father Long later was named director of the Institute.

In 2000, after nine years in Arizona, Father John moved to Houston, Texas, to the Carmelite pre-novitiate program at Casa Santa Teresita. As a member of the formation staff there he was a model for men considering a religious vocation within the Order. At that time, he changed from the Province of Saint Elias to become a member of the Most Pure Heart of Mary Province.

Retiring to Saint Agnes Parish in Phoenix, in 2003, Father John remained active, ministering to parishioners as well as remaining in community with his brother Carmelites.

Suffering from congestive heart failure, Father Long was admitted to Arizona Heart Hospital in late August. There he was diagnosed with cancer. He died a few days later at the age of 80 years.

May he rest in peace.


Father Morris Wells, O.Carm.

BY JOSEPH KERZICH

Fr. Wells

The Province of the Most Pure Heart of Mary, Order of Carmelites, mourns the death of the Reverend Morris B. Wells, O.Carm., who died at the age of 70 on August 14, 2008, in Sarasota, Florida.
Father Morris laid in state at Saint Raphael Catholic Church, Englewood, Florida. Burial was held at Venice Memorial Gardens, Venice, Florida. The Very Reverend John Welch, O.Carm., Prior Provincial, was the main celebrant. Reverend Gavin Quinn, O,Carm., was the homilist.

Born Francis Wells in Manchester, New Hampshire, on July 29, 1938, he took the religious name Morris upon his admittance to the Order of Carmelites. Educated at Saint Joseph Grade School and Bishop Bradley High School, both in Manchester, New Hampshire, Francis entered the Carmelite Junior Seminary, in Hamilton, Massachusetts, in 1953. He entered the Carmelite Novitiate in New Baltimore, Pennsylvania, in 1957 and professed simple vows there one year later. From 1957 to1961 Morris studied at Saint Bonaventure University, Olean, New York, where he completed a Bachelors degree in Philosophy.

Brother Morris professed solemn vows February 8, 1962, at Whitefriars Hall, in Washington, DC, the Province’s major house of study. On September 7, 1964, in Chicago, Illinois, Morris Wells was ordained to the priesthood. During this time Father Morris studied at Canisius College, Buffalo, New York, completing a master of science degree in biology and education in 1966. The same year he received a Licentiate of Sacred Theology at Catholic University of America, Washington, DC.

Father Wells was assigned to teach seminarians at Mount Carmel College, Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada, from 1966 to1968. Father Wells was transferred to Carmel Hall, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1968; there he was a member of the formation team while continuing his studies in Theology at Marquette University. On Christmas Eve 1969, Father Morris wrote to then Prior Provincial Malachy Smith from Carmel Hall, expressing his decision to enter the U.S. Army Chaplain Corps, noting the many hours he spent praying over this direction in his ministry before making a final determination.

Entering the Army’s Chaplain School at Fort Hamilton, New York, in 1970, he was then assigned to Fort Lewis, Washington, for further training. Chaplain Wells was deployed to the Vietnam War in 1971 with the 196th Infantry Division. Beginning in 1972 Chaplain Wells was assigned to Fort Knox, Kentucky, attached to the 19th Battalion, 5th Training Brigade. In 1976 Chaplain Morris Wells was transferred to the 2nd Brigade, 8th Infantry Division, United States Forces Europe, at Baumholder, Germany.

In 1978 the Army sent Chaplain Wells to Azusa Pacific University, North Hollywood, California, for studies in Marriage and Family Counseling where he received a Master of Arts Degree in 1980.

Subsequently, he was a Clinical Member of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.
With these credentials, he was transferred to the Family Life Center at Fort Hood, Texas, until 1983 when he was appointed as a Chaplain to the U.S. Disciplinary Barracks, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas; interestingly enough, Carmelite’s first foundation in North America is located at the nearby Saint Joseph Parish in Leavenworth.

In 1984, Father Morris was honorably discharged from active military service with the rank of Major. During his tenure he was awarded the Bronze Star, twice awarded the Meritorious Service Medal, five times awarded the Army Commendation Medal along with the Vietnam Service Medal.

Upon departing from Army service Father Morris would find himself focusing on his brother Carmelites and the people they served for years to come. From 1984 to 1987 Father Morris was Pastor of Saint Joseph Parish, Bogota, New Jersey. In 1987, he was elected by his peers to a three-year term as Commissary Provincial of the Eastern Region of the province, while residing at Saint Cecilia Parish, Englewood, New Jersey.

In 1993 he moved to Saint Simon Stock Community, Darien, Illinois, as Director of Carmelite Missions. There he coordinated and participated in mission visits to parishes throughout the United States, encouraging parish support of Carmelite missions in Peru, Mexico and other nations.

In 1996 Father Morris moved to Grove City, Florida, where he became Associate Pastor of Saint Francis Assisi Parish until 2000. At the start of the new Millennium, Father Morris Wells would serve his last four years of active ministry as Pastor of Saint Raphael Parish, Englewood, Florida, before retiring to Carmel in Venice, Florida, in 2004.

May he rest in peace.


A Tribute to Father Morris Wells, O.Carm.

BY FRANK BOULEY

I’m a parishioner of St Catherine of Bolognia in Ringwood, New Jersey. Most of you don’t know me, but we are brought together to pay respect to Father Morris Wells. I’m sure most of you knew Father Wells as your priest here at Saint Joseph’s. After his career as chaplain in the military, he received his first pastoral assignment on June 30, 1984 becoming pastor of Saint Joseph’s.

Father Wells and I crossed paths in the swirl of history known as the 1970’s. I was a specialist in the Army and I newly transferred to Baumholder, Germany in 1977.

I was on my own. I didn’t know anyone. One evening as I walked the post alone, I heard music playing and a choir singing out in the distance. I loved choir as a student during my years in high school, so I followed the sound.

I arrived to find my future at Chapel #2, where I met and was befriended by Father Morris. I became a member of his choir and became his student soon after. I was never a Catholic, never had religion. Just a seed of an idea of what God was, and his purpose for me.

Father took this seed and nurtured it. On January 20th, 1978, I was baptized, received First Communion, and was then confirmed. I learned to pray the Rosary and one month later I was back stateside, to “the world” and soon after, went to college.

The path since has been marked by spiritual success and failure. In 1985 I met and married a wonderful Catholic lady. We’ve been married ever since. We have brought our two beautiful children into the Catholic school system and church.

I am now a 4th degree Knight. Every time I pray the Rosary, anytime I say a prayer, I give credit to the one who gave my spiritual seed meaning.

1978 seems like such a long time ago. I look at fading pictures of a man who had such a profound impact on my life, and the lives of my family. His influence rings loud and true in my memory, and I know that he has touched each and every one of you in his own way. And that part is the most enduring part of Father Wells. He will live on as long as there are lips to tell his story. After looking back on the 30 year-long journey since we first met, I see I was not alone on the road that led me to his parish.

God bless him, and God bless you all.

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